Environment

Environment
March 7, 2013 Super User

Hoylake is a seaside village on the northwest corner of the Wirral Peninsula, which boasts forty miles of coastline along the River Mersey to the east, the Irish Sea to the north, and the River Dee to the south.  The peninsula experiences a moderate climate with higher than average sunshine and lower than average rainfall.

Hoylake’s extensive promenade affords easy access to miles of beach beloved of horse riders, sand yachters and kite flyers.  There are spectacular views across to Hilbre Islands and North Wales and northwards towards Liverpool and the Sefton coast

Hoylake’s position at the mouth of the Dee Estuary means that it is a bird-watchers paradise.  The estuary is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and during the winter months the estuary provides sanctuary for many over-wintering visitors, including huge flocks of wildfowl and waders.  Dunlin, bartailed godwit, knot, oystercatcher, sanderling, redshank, curlew and turnstone can be seen feeding along the tide line. Spectacular aerial displays are common throughout the year.

A short walk along Hoylake shore lies an area known as Red Rocks where pools support a small population of Natterjack Toads. Wild flowers, butterflies and skylarks can all be found in the sand dunes there.  The dunes are also home to rare grasses, including a rare horsetail.

Access to Hilbre Islands, Little Eye, Middle eye and Hilbre, is possible at low tide from the beach at West Kirby.  Apart from the bird-watching opportunities from Hilbre’s bird observatory, a colony of grey seals can be seen on the island’s sandbanks or swimming just off shore.

Many of the original Hoylake buildings were demolished in the mid-nineteenth century to make way for new ones.  This was brought about by an upsurge in the village’s popularity as a desirable place to live and to take holidays.  As the fishing industry declined, so the village took on another life: somewhere for wealthy merchants from Liverpool to come and experience open spaces and exhilarating sea air.

Many of the buildings that make up modern Hoylake date from the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth. The charm of the built infrastructure is the wide variety of architectural styles.  Fishermen’s cottages often stand dwarfed by larger, more imposing houses, many of them from the Victorian and Edwardian eras.

To find out more about wirral beyond Hoylake and the many things you can do here, go to the Wirral Peninsula website here.

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